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and ground assault to put it out. >>> 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king jr. delivered one of the world's most memorable messages. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for wednesday, august 28th. >>> good morning, everybody. i'm richard louie. >>> senior u.s. officials tell nbc news a u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. momentum for action against the alleged chemical attacks appears to be building globally. british prime minister david cameron called his parliament back to debate a response. an emergency vote will be held thursday. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says israel will respond with force if syria does anything to harm israel. the arab league is blaming the syrian government, demanding international trials. but venezuela president nicolas madura, a close ally of syria's president assad, says military action could essentially be the beginning of a great international firestorm. nbc's aymman joins us now. >> reporter: washington says this is not about regime change, that the united
on the importance of his vision. the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. was born in 1929 in atlanta, georgia. he became a leader who dedicated his whole life to fighting racial discrimination. he delivered his "i have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial in washington, d.c., on august 28th, 1963. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> his historic speech electrified millions of americans who were fighting for civil rights. he received the nobel peace prize the following year for his tireless work, but during a visit to tennessee in 1968 he was shot and killed. he was just 39 years old. on saturday, thousands gathered in washington to commemorate his historic speech. >>> the vision laid out by dr. king has been remembered and celebrated around the world. in tokyo, a concert was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the m
carter, bill clinton and barack obama speak from the same steps where dr. martin luther king jr. delivered the historic speech. organizers expect thousands to turnout to show that dr. king's dream still lives on. a day will begin with prayer at the shiloh baptist church. >> we were behind where dr. king's shoulder is, we were close enough to be able to hear all the speeches. >> lynn was just 16 when she attended the 1963 march on washington, dc, and hopes today's speeches inspire younger generations to keep fighting for justice. >> what is disturbing is to see that even with the black president we still have a long way to go. >> congressman john lewis a young student agoer and a line still resonates. >> "let freedom ring." people across america if their hearts believe freedom should ring for everyone. >> this afternoon, bells from church towers this washington to government buildings an the world will ring in honor of the famous phrase "let freedom read." >> thank you very much. stay with abc7 news and we have continuing cork on the march on washington the 50th anniversary when
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
dr. martin luther king, jr. theme >> the u.n. special enjoy to syria wants to see the evidence the u.s. and its allies say they have concerning a chemical weapons attack in that nation. he spoke only one hour ago as the world awaits action on president bashar assad's regime. we've seen the images of the children and family suffering from symptoms similar to those caused by chemical weapons. the enjoy said the evidence does suggest some sort of chemical weapon was used, killing hundreds. >> i know that the americans and the british and others say that they know that chemical weapons have been used. what we have been told is that this evidence that the americans, the british, the french say they have is going to be shared with us. it hasn't been until now, and we will be very, very, very interested in hearing from them what this evidence they have is. >> a u.s. coalition strike on syria is very much at the center of international debate this morning. france's parliament is holding a special session to discuss syria. other voices before and against are now weighing in. british fin
and speech writer for dr. martin luther king, jr., he worked with him closely until his death. he also teaches at the university of san francisco. mr. clarence jones, thank you for joining us tonight, sir, it's an honor to have you here. >> thank you, rachel. >> go ahead, sir. >> i wanted to say, you got it right, except that in signing the promissory note, it was a demand, which meant the promissory note is payable any time the creditor wants to be paid. when i left the bank, i was so surprised by this, that i called harry bellafonte and said, harry, you didn't tell me i'd have to sign a demand promissory note. he said, well, better you than me. i said, but you have more money than i do. but in any event it was done, and we were appreciative of it, i took the money to birmingham, and the following, that was on a saturday, the following tuesday, there was a messenger that came to my office with an envelope marked personal and confidential, and the envelope and there was the promissory note i signed and it said paid in full. obviously i didn't pay it, it had been paid. that was a profou
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
fire of negro resistance which was transformed into negro revolution. >> dr. martin luther king's, jr. unmatched delivery and his timeless words as we well know made history. still to come, the man we just introduced you to, clarence jones shares a little known fact [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. ♪ >>> exactly 50 years ago this evening, not far from here, washington's famed willard hotel, a young black preacher sat trying to write a speech. the words didn't come to him that night, instead it wasn't until the next afternoon as he stood before hundreds of thousands of people on the great mall that the preacher found a way to tell america about his dream. today i met dr. clarence jones who is a lawyer, a counselor, sometimes a cure your, and i asked him how martin luther king king, jr. found those mighty words. >> i would like you to bring me back to august 27th, '50 years ago at the willard hotel. >> dr. king was in the hotel in a suite working on the speech with his wife. he had given considerable thought about the direction
.com. ♪ ♪ >>> it is an emotional week here in washington as the city marks the 50th anniversary of dr. martin luther king jr's i have a dream speech. which was delivered on the steps of the lincoln memorial. but there was another message from dr. king that historians agree set in motion a revolutionary movement, one which lead to the march on washington. tonight the story of the letter from a birmingham jail. >> when you were coming to birmingham in 1963, you were coming to ku klux klan country. birmingham had nor unsolved bombings of negro homes and churches than any other city in the nation. the ku klux klan and racial segregationalists were not about to let some negro preacher from atlanta or some group of demonstrators either in birmingham or outside the state to come and change their way of life. this is our place. this is our power. how dare you come in and want to take -- share our power from us. >> it was some very dark days in birmingham, alabama. >> in birmingham then the police fear. >> they had intimidated the working black people, and dr. king knew that. the movement was stagnated. it was dead. >>
'm jim vance. 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. told us his dream for america, we are reminded of how far we have come and how far we still have to go. just as 50 years ago today started with a march. thousands of people walking, some hand in hand, demanding jobs and justice. >> on the steps of the lincoln memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech, we heard from congressman john lewis, the last surviving speaker from the 1963 event. members of the king family and former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter also addressed the crowd. >> bells rang across this country at 3:00 this afternoon. 50 years after dr. king called upon america to let freedom ring. president obama honored those who marched for all that we have today but he also said the march isn't over. >> the universe may bend toward justice but it doesn't bend on its own. to secure the gains this country has made requires constant vigilance not complacency. whether by challenging those who erect new barriers to the vote or ensuring that the scales of justice work equally for all in the criminal justice syst
the entire, i have a dream speech by dr. martin luther king, jr. that. before kevin finally came home and the first grandchild arrived, before the sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, and brad's brief brush with the law... man: smile. before the second british invasion... before katie, debbie, kevin, and brad... before they became a family, there was a connection that started it all and made the future the wonderful thing it turned out to be. we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. >>> the following limited commercial presentation is made possible by bank of america. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, worki
th anniversary of the mark on washington and dr. martin luther king, jr's "i have a dream" speech. another marching ceremony will take place and president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial. >>> three days before his historic march on washington, back in 1963, dr. martin luther king jr. appeared on nbc's "meet the press." >> i don't think our society h rise to its full maturity until we come to see that men are made to live together as brothers and that we can have again win intergroup and interpersonal living and still be in the kind of society which we all long to achieve. >> this sunday, 50 years after that interview, nbc will air a special edition of "meet the press" "remembering the dream." i spoke. moderator david gregory about the special and he says it's a look back and a look forward. >> it is referencing and seeing this appearance on "meet the press" and then 50 years later talking about what the american dream means now. not just in terms of civil rights and equality for african-americans, but for all americans since the american dream and the promi
today, dr. martin luther king jr. delivered one of the world's most memorable messages. >>> good morning, everybody, i'm betty nguyen. >>> senior u.s. officials tell nbc news a u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. momentum for action against the alleged chemical attacks appears to be building globally. british prime minister david cameron called his parliament back to debate a response. an emergency vote will be held thursday. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says israel will respond with force if syria does anything to harm israel. the arab league is blaming the syrian government, demanding international trials. but venezuela president nicolas madura, a close ally of president assad, says military action could essentially be the beginning of a great international firestorm. nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engle has the story. >> reporter: washington says this is not about regime change, that the united states doesn't want to get involved in syria's civil war. they said this will simply be a punitive action so that the use of c
denees. born of cortea scott king and the namesake of dr. martin luther king, jr., ladies and gentlemen, martin luther king iii. five decades ago, my father dr. martin luther king, jr., stood upon this hallowed spot. and the spirit of god spoke through him and summoned the nation to repent and to redress the shameful sins long visited upon its african american brothers and sisters. 50 years ago, he delivered a sermon on this mountain which crystalized like never before the painful pilgrimmage and aspirations of african americans yearning to breathe ree in our own homeland. with martin luther king's lamenting were not an eye spiring diatribe of true conditions of the day. no, indeed, his words are etched in eternity and echo through the ages to us today were a tribute to the tenacity of an intrepid people who though oppressed refused to remain in bondage. those words of martin luther king, jr., were a clarion call to all people of good will to rise up together, to make this nation live out the true meaning of its creed and to perfect within us a more perfect union. and so i stand here to
to the traditional family, and not only among blacks. >> we feel the spirit of dr. martin luther king jr. who would challenge us to honor the sacred charters of our liberty. >> i believe that gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. martin luther king. >> i'm not asking you for a sort of definitive historical account of who would not be in the graces of the departed. but it is now a game in american politics to appropriate the legacy of your father for these different political lines. >> actually, it is. that is good and bad. >> how is it good? >> it's good because everyone can sort of immerse themselves and say we do believe in dr. king. now, it's upon others of us, must challenge them to enforce what dad wanted to happen, and not to try to say, well, dr. king fits -- dr. king is against affirmative action, that just is not true. even though he wanted to see the day when his children would be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. reality is, i as an older person am judged by the content of my character. trayvon martin was profiled and tragically lost hi
that dr. martin luther king, jr. had for all. >> i have a dream. okay, listen up! i'm re-workin' the menu. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition inharge™. ♪ [ male announcer ] bob's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today his doctor has him on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. >>> celebrations under way in our nation's capitol. the legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr. we're taking you live to the lincoln memorial, 50 years after the march on washington and dr. martin luther king, jr.'s, i have dream speech. and president obama will stand on those same steps. it brought change at a time protesters were fighting for equal treatment under the law. live at the lincoln memorial with a look at today's events. hello, doug. >> reporter: hi, shannon, the crowd is beginning to build d
hour dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his now famous vision. the unforgettable voice paved the way for this moment. president obama, the nation's first black president, spending exactly where dr. king stood, reflecting on the progress and the work that remains. >> no one can match king's brilliance, but the same flame that let the heart of all who were willing to take the first step for justice, i know that flame remains. >> jim crow had a son called james crow jr. esquire. he writes voting suppression laws, and puts it in language that looks different but the results are the same. >> reporter: standing between three presidents on one side, and the king family on another, congressman john lewis, the last surviving speaker of the '63 march, challenged the nation, as dr. king did to make good on its promise. >> unemployment, poverty, and hunger, or the new struggle for voting rights. i say to each one of you today, we must never, ever give up. >> reporter: president obama and others pointed out the original march was about jobs and justice. noting the unemployment for blacks is almo
disputes in the south china sea. 50 years ago, dr. martin luther king jr. inspired a nation with his now iconic "i have a dream" speech. coming up, how thousands commemorated the anniversary and honored dr. king with their own march on washington. >> 50 years ago, u.s. civil rights leader dr. martin luther king jr. gave his famous "i have a dream" each of the march on washington. today, thousands returned to the national mall to celebrate that anniversary. >> it was a very exciting day on the mall, despite a bit of rain. people came from all over the country to reflect on dr. king's legacy and take stock of what still needs to be done to make his dream a reality. on a rainy afternoon, 50 years later, dr. martin luther king's famous words still echo through the steps of the lincoln memorial. >> i have a dream. >> for michael howard andrea miller, who traveled from california for the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, the dream is still very much alive. >> it was a dream to think i would live to see a black president. or even a dream to believe that there would be there or better
out. you're watching "early today." >>> welcome back. dr. martin luther king jr. gave his legendary "i have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial 50 years ago this week. in celebration of the anniversary, the capitol will be hosting a number of events and rallies. people are expected to attend a rally on saturday. and the president will be marking the anniversary on wednesday with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. bill clinton and jimmy carter will also be featured. >>> now to some other stories making news this morning. bradley manning, the soldier who leaked thousands of secret government documents, was sentenced to 35 years in prison on wednesday. manning's lawyer has other plans, though, saying the army private could be out in as little as seven years and may even seek a presidential pardon. >>> the girlfriend of the australian baseball player shot dead in oklahoma says finding out about his death was the most shocking thing she ever experienced and her heart, quote, just broke right there. when asked about the three teens suspected of the murders, she said she never
since dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his "i have a dream" speech. yet americans remain deeply divided over just how color blind our country is today. details next. >>> heading into the fifty anniversary of martin luthening king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech, the majority of white americans believe we've become a color blind society. but only 20% of african-americans say we are color blind. nbc's rehema ellis reports on the impact of dr. king's legacy and what it means to young people today. >> at the city pool in cincinnati, ohio, these kids will tell you, they are living part of dr. king's dream. >> we can all play together and drink the same water, go to the same water fountain. >> without him, we would never be able to do that. >> we really hope that one day that everybody can just be treated equally and fairly and no discrimination. >> you three are? >> on a hot summer day we got nine young students age 12 to 16 years old to talk about a way of life in america that they've never known. a time when hundreds of thousands marched on washington for jobs and freedom. and martin
freedom ring commemoration remembers dr. dr. martin luther king jr. i have a dream speech with musical performances. >> in san francisco, plain clothe police will wear cameras during property certain. the project comes after questionable drug raids at residential hotels in 2011. the prosecution dropped dozens of cases after footage from the hotel security prompted allegations the officers lied of the circumstances of drug searches and arrests. police were also accused of stealing from suspects. the cameras will be warn on their chest. >> oakland police, the c.h.p., and the coast guard and other bay area agencies have joined forces to clean out the oakland estuary. dozens of officers gathered at jack london square boarding boats and will patrol the waters looking for abandoned or illegal boats and anything el in the estuary they deem "dangerous." >> mike nicco is ahead with the forecast. >> holiday coming up this weekend and putting summer to bed in most parts of the country but here it will get warmer in september and october. i will talk to you about the cooling trend coming this week
years since dr. martin luther king, jr., historic speech at the steps of the lincoln memorial. president obama will make a speech tomorrow in front of a crowd that organizers expect to top 20,000 people. >>> we've been warning about it for months. the bay bridge will shut down tomorrow night. believe it or not, we talked to people who still hasn't gotten the message. >>> the reason behind the new ban considered for a bay area city. >>> imagine having $3 billion in cash that you can't use? that's exactly what happened to the federal reserve after the mint messed up. ,,,,,,,,,,,,, tomorrow night at eight. and will reopen next tuesday. we . >>> the bay bridge closes in less than 24 hours. it shuts down tomorrow night at 8:00 and it reopen on tuesday. we talked about and reported on it for months. brian web tells us, some people are still in the dark. brian? >> reporter: this time tomorrow night, the bridge will be closed. this could serve as one of the final warnings, anyway. even though that's been front- page news for several months, i met several people who have no idea what i was talkin
rights speech delivered by dr. martin luther king, jr. theme >> strike on syria, all eyes are on the u.s. this morning to see how it will respond to last week's alleged chemical weapons attack by the assad regime. the u.n. envoy suggests that a chemical weapon was used. the chorus of other international voices weigh in. british prime minister david cameron drafted a resolution on syria to be presented to the u.n. security council today. all members of u.n. security council especially russia are urged to back the resolution. russia warns against a strike, saying any intervention without a resolution would have "catastrophic consequences." iran has also weighed in, lawmakers issuing tacker warnings to the u.s. and allies saying war with syria would lead to retaliation on israel fanned by the flames of outrage. >> the u.s. is a driving force for an any intervention. we're hearing a decision could be made any day now. what's the latest? >> the official line is that the president is still consulting with top members of his cabinet, top security advisers. members of congress are being called
. it was 50 years ago today that dr. martin luther king, jr. delivered those four famous words "i have a dream." thousands are gathering at the mall to remember that speech. >>> and weapons investigators continuing their investigation in syria. >>> the syrian electronic army is taking aim at american news websites. twitter released a statement saying no user data has been effected. the syrian electronic army using its twitter account to publicize the attack on both of the websites. the group supports syrian president, bashar al-assad. >>> the international atomic energy group says iran has installed one thousand units for nuclear reaction. a stockpile of uranium gas is still below the red line. >>> the cult -- cult profit that killed the dolphins is now thought to be a virus. i'm del walters. this is al jazeera. you are watching more news at the top of the hour. ♪
'm del walters. it was 50 years ago today that dr. martin luther king, jr. delivered those famous four words. today thousands heading to the national mall to commemorate his iconic "i have a dream" speech >>> the syrian ambassador is asking the word body to investigate his claims that rebels were behind the chemical weapons attack. >>> iran's nuclear program is now expanding. it has installed hundred thousand centrifuges. the stockpile of uranium gas is still below the red line. >>> in new jersey texting while driving could mean fines if you cause an accident, it could mean prison time. and it's not just the drivers that can get in trouble, but the senders as well if they know the person sending the text is behind the wheel. >>> how much would you say for a bowl? a few dollars? how about $10 million? a ware blue and white bowl from china being auctioned off next month, estimated value $10 million. it comes from 15th century china, during the chin wa period. if the bowl is purchased at its estimated price of $10 million that would set a new auction record. and just in case you are curio
'll del winters. it was 50 years ago today that dr. martin luther king jr. delivered those four famous words, thousands today are on the national mall to look back at his iconic "i have a dream" speech. president obama is set to speak in are a couple of hours--in a f hours. we'll bring that to you live. >>> the syrian ambassador has asked for investigate on chemicals weapons used on the syrian army. >>> iran is expanding it's nuclear program. iran has installed 1,000 centro huges for advanced uranium enrichment, and they are working on a reactor to create a bomb. they stock pile uranium gas still blow the red line israel has referenced that would invoke military action. >>> if you cause an accident, it means that you spend time behind bars, now a state appellate court says it's not those who are reading texts who could be in trouble but the person who sent it as well. if they know the person who received the text is behind the wheel and is still driver. a teen was texting a driver who then crashed into a motorcycle, leaving them with severe leg injuries. >>> the conflict in syria hits
march on washington led by dr. martin luther king jr. early today, leap rhymes sang "amazing grace." ♪ amazing grace ♪ how sweet the sound jamie foxx and al sharpton also spoke this morning. >> abc7 news is joined by our reporter in washington, dc. >> good morning, that is oprah winfrey talking behind me and it is a tall order to try to speak as she is speaking but right now you can see that the people have all their eyes on oprah. it seems like this maybe was a little bit slow to get going but it is very humid here and this has been a lot of rain and people have to go through security checkpoints in order to come out here but, now, this is a crowd that is excited and eagerly awaiting remarks from president obama. it is impossible to miss the symbolism of the nation's first black president speaking on the 50th anniversary of dr. king's "i have a dream" speech. a lot people just happy to be here. there are so many people who were here 50 years ago who decided to come back and are paying attention right now. >> can you give us a hint as to what the president will say today when h
conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would change? >> there was but i think it had -- that had a lot to do with the expectations of the people of my parents' generation they had of us. and you know, also, a lot of black fathers gone -- were in world war ii and they went to fight for democracy and they came back and still had segregation and a lot of discrimination. so they expected us to be that generation that would change things. but i think if there was one symbol, that we al
to this tragic war. >> that was dr. martin luther king jr. in 1967. quick question -- if he were alive today, i wish he were, would he support military operations in syria? >> i'm sure that dr. king would not. it's interesting. i actually was born in '68, born the year he was killed -- >> don't rub it in. >> true story. true story. i was born the year he was killed, and bobby kennedy was killed. certainly in my generation, has learned that you do not go into -- and put troops on the ground recklessly, but this is not what the president is proposing. he's basically saying we're going to do a brush back, tell this guy you can't keep doing it, and he should come to congress and discuss what's going forward, and we should build a coalition of forces to move frashd. >> we'll continue to conversation, but a gl start to our program here in "the situation room." thanks very much. >>> "new york times" knocked off-line apparentlily syrian hackers. we've invited the paper's security correspondent to deliver the latest reporting. stand by for that. >>> plus presidents carter, clinton and obama all speaking
but nowhere near as badly as we were when dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his speech here in washington in 1963. 50 years later marching in washington again was ducky burris. less emotional this time. >> now i'm 77. >> reporter: is it because things are better now? >> things are better in some areas. >> reporter: half a century later on this day as the crowd gathered in the rain at the lincoln memorial only 54% of americans believe the dream has been achieved. only 21% of african-americans do. congressman john lewis is the sole surviving speaker from '63. >> 50 years later we can ride anywhere we want to ride, we can say what we want to say. those lines that say whites and colored are gone. >> reporter: all eyes were on america's first black president. barack obama did not descend from slaves but to many he is a realization of king's dream. >> because they marched city councils changed, state legislatures changed and congress changed and eventually the white house changed. >> reporter: he said the struggle now ought to be about everyone's economic security. >> the measure of progress fo
on washington and one of the most historic speeches of all time. dr. martin luther king jr. 's i have a dream speech. president obama was among the thousands who gathered on the national mall in washington to honor those who marched and thought for civil rights. here in the bay area, kron 4's haaziq madyun caught up with someone who was there for the original gathering and marched back in 1963. >> yes. >> reporter: you are look at a newspaper clipping photo of the legendary former oakland parts and recks supervisor paterson. taken when he was at the historic march on washington. >> king was a catalyst. >> reporter: on this 50th anniversary of king's i have a dream speech, patterson reflects on being there that monumental day. >> you think all these folk are going to washington. am i going to go to? nothing kept me back. >> reporter: nothing held back patterson who developed such great oakland sports luminaries like kirk flood and bill russell. always inspiring others, however, patterson says it was king who inspired him as he it is on the board of directors on the east bay municipal utility d
of the feelings i felt because dr. martin luther king jr. told us to think positive and to go home and help our families and help our communities. and we did that. >> reporter: in 1963, they rode a bus from arkansas, this time, many of their children and grandchildren and families made that trip. >> all of those who sacrificed their lives, made it for us today. it seems to be slipping away from us, we need to recapture it. >> coming from all walks of life. it represents us. >> i would say if you can't take a bus ride for justice, then you know, you don't deserve it. >> right. >> so i'll ride that three or four times if i have to. >> exactly. >> thank you for this trip. >> reporter: the bus broke down on the way, but nothing could break their resolve to get here. sarah and diana were waiting to welcome them. >> you said you would get here. >> sure did, sure did. thank you. yeah. >> reporter: emotionally, where are you today compared to 50 years ago in. >> emotionally, 50 years ago i was sad and angry. sad because living in arkansas, and being treated as a second class citizen was not a very good
the march on washington and dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech. in their own words 50 years later. >> because they march, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed and, yes, eventually the white house changed. >> 50 years ago, our parents and grandparents marched for jobs and freedom. we have suffered and sacrificed too much to let their dream become a memory. >> we've got to keep on fighting and we've got to vindicate and stand up and substantiate that the dream was not to one generation. the dream goes on until the dream is achieved. >> so as the bells of freedom ring today, we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. >> what an amazing day it was. >>> to the u.s. open and a dramatic exit for venus williams. the two-time champ finding herself at a tiebreaker against china's zv heng jie. she's out of the u.s. open. jie wins the three-hour battle. it was the longest women's match so
of the march on washington. dr. martin luther king, jr.'s i have a dream speech. on thursday, the second estimate for the second quarter gdp is due, typically a market mover and billionaire investor warren buffett celebrates his 83rd birthday. phil mickelson cemented his financial success in golf. and i talked to him about an interesting side effect. the 60% tax bill on his winning. >> it's tough to talk about because nobody wants to be insensitive, nobody wants to be insensitive, a tough time where a lot of people are having a hard time with work, i have a chns to spend time with ceo s. a lot of them, quality individuals, that are having a hard time hiring because of the unturni i uncertainty that is going on. so, it's not making me want to go out and work harder. >> would you actually leave the country? oh, no, no, no i love this place. a lot of people thought i grew up in a country club. i didn't. i grew up in a family that was lower middle class and we did fine. but i wanted to play golf and i didn't have the tun. i did not have a club to practice at? you know what i did? i went down
years ago marching beside activists following dr. martin luther king, jr. and other leaders that would become icons. at saturday's rally to kick off the 50th anniversary, johnson wears the pin she got at the first march in 1963. >> it was just a warm feeling then and it's a warm feeling noup. -- now. and i'm pleased to come and commemorate dr. martin luther king. >> thousands gathered for a celebration of freedom in washington, d.c. passionate speakers paid tribute to those who fought for racial quality and those who continue to fight for various issues. > he says there has been a lot of progress in the passing time and change moving forward is everyone's responsibility. >> all of us, it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, latino or native american. it doesn't matter whether we are straight or gay, we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we all live in the same house. >> a march and anthem reminiscent of the scene five decades ago. a memory cher risched to this day. >> this day made everything we went through. it's a blessing. president obama and form irpreside
theocracy whir watching this commemoration of dr. martin luther king, jr.'s march for jobs and freedom here 50 years ago today. i'm here of course with "hardball" anchor and reporter today chris matthews. chris, we've been listening to the speeches and watching and thinking about what happened here 50 years ago. it resonates for you? >> i have to tell you so far today the best part has been andrew young. andrew young is an older guy. like me, maybe. he brought some joy to the occasion today. i think -- what's remarkable about today, the "new york times" wrote the most extraordinary -- >> it was the best explanation of what the speech itself meant. she wrote about the fact that reverend king was son, the grandson and great-grandson of a baptist preacher. the i have a dream is in response from mahalia jackson. >> and all of that is a continuity going all the way back to the declaration of independence through the proclamation proclam ation -- proclamation emancipation and the sweltering summer of discontent. the poetry of martin luther king. >> the speech started as prose and was an economic
. martin luther king jr. featured on the cover of this week's issue of "time" magazine, the headline "founding father." what about his skekers? joining me now chris hayes host of all in with chris harris". thanks for joining us. later tonight, 8:00 p.m. eastern, you play dr. king's speech, as well in its entirety. it is rare for people to have this opportunity and msnbc is lucky enough to play the entire speech because the king estate owns the right to this video. it has a copyright on it until 203. and this is why so many people have not seen it unflip theed. nothing in the middle, just the purity of the speech itself. and i myself as one of those people included in that. >> yeah, it was remarkable. i just watched it on our air just now and i've read it a bunch of times. i think i've seen it once or twice before. >> i've reenacted it in school place. but to see it on that screen with no break, we've seen it in documentaries sliced and diced but to pull it in the way we've been able to do today and at 8:00 with you i think is remarkable. >> and there's a bunch of things that come out
and talking to the crowd. the march on washington is where dr. martin luther king, jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech. today's rallies raise awareness to social issues. the four year anniversary of the march is wednesday. the bay area will have several events commemorating the march today. in san rose the naacp is holding a short meeting followed by a one-mile march. begins at 9:00 at st. james park. in oakland the bay area black worker center is sponsoring a rally at 1:00 on webster street. in san francisco an lbgt coalition is holding a meeting on city hall. it will pay tribute to openly civil rights gay leader mr. ruston. >> now on to a video that's gone viral. it appears to be a toxic chemical attack on civilians and people in syria. allen wong has the story. >> about 100 members of the syrian american council in san jose urged the u.s. to respond to what appears to be a toxic gas attack on syrian civilians and residents. >> 67% of those killed are children and women, according to the syrian medical society. it's not rebels, it's children. >> the u.s. and the united nations a
. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city. we will be able to speed up that day with all of god's children, black men and white men, jews and gentiles, protestants and catholic, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old knnegro spiritual, freet last, free at last, thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> to think the most famous part of the speech was ad libbed. at this hour, thousands are retracing the steps of the original marchers heading down constitution avenue to the washington memorial and the national mall. two hours from now, a program commemorating the march and the speech will begin. then some time after 2:00, president obama and former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter will speak on the steps of t
speech commemorating this moment when dr. martin luther king, jr. was delivering his famous i have a dream speech before the march on washington back in 1963 and john harwood, you can't help but think that mr. obama is there speaking not loin as head of state but gives him an opportunity speak as an african-american as well. >> absolutely right. he also acknowledged the big shadow that he was speaking under. he said no one can match king's brilliance. you have a part of the speech that was universal and cast it as part of the quest for worldwide freedom, for gays and women in the united states and other groups as well. but you also had a very combative part of the speech called out progressives for some racial division within their side of the political argument, but was very tough on what he called entrenched interests and lobbyists who wanted to preserve inequality and did it with a tone of frustration, bill, that seemed to say he was cognizant of those impossible odds he referred to at the end of his speech. he has a big challenge. >> it was very balanced, john, absolutely, when
of dr. martin luther king, jr., ladies and gentlemen, martin luther king iii. >> five decades ago, my father dr. martin luther king, jr., stood upon this hallowed spot. and the spirit of god spoke through him and summoned the nation to repent and to redress the shameful sins long visited upon its african american brothers and sisters. 50 years ago, he delivered a sermon on this mountain which crystalized like never before the painful pilgrimage and aspirations of african americans yearning to breathe free in our own homeland. with martin luther king's lamenting were not an aspiring diatribe of true conditions of the day. no, indeed, his words are etched in eternity and echo through the ages to us today were a tribute to the tenacity of an intrepid people who though oppressed refused to remain in bondage. those words of martin luther king, jr., were a clarion call to all people of good will to rise up together, to make this nation live out the true meaning of its creed and to perfect within us a more perfect union. and so i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps
you money? >> plus, dream remembered. how a nation is paying tribute to dr. martin luther king, jr.'s famous speech. >> what drivers are deal with on the streets of mexico. ,, ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing live tv from southwest. now you can turn your device into your television. try it for free today, only on southwest airlines. on the air. in the air. with live tv. too small. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. inspired by perfection. [ female announcer ] at 100 calories, not all food choices add up. some are giant. some not so giant. when managing your weight, bigger is always better. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant female narrator: through monday, get three years through monday, get three years interest-free financing and save up to $400 on beautyrest and posturepedic. even get three years interest-free financing on serta icomfort and tempur-pedic, but this special financing offer ends labor day at sleep train. canals rose so much after a tropical storm... they brought the crocs to the ro the civil prote
of government in a ceremony on the lincoln memorial. the same location where dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his i have a dream speech. you would hear from the reverend holder, then, eric reverend al sharpton, among others as a picture butte to the events of the day -- as they pay tribute to the events of the day. >> for those of us from the south, 50 years ago we received our marching orders when dr. martin luther king jr. quote it the prophet isaiah, i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted and every hill should be made low and the crooked places will be made straight and the glory of the lord should be revealed and all flesh. and this is the faith that we go back to the south with and those are our marching orders and this is the faith that we go back to the south with. yes, the south. where some are still trying to fight the civil war. where we areh witnessing this vicious attack on voters, voting rights, and the blatant voting suppression i .ne particular political party yes, the south where young teenage african-american boys cannot walk the streets of his f
. >> when dr. martin luther king, jr., was assassinated in tennessee in 1968 he hadden working with sanitation worker striking for better wages, recognition of their union. the day before he was killed he sfo with workers urging them to adhere to nonviolence, warning looting that broke out at a march diverted the story away from the injustices they were facing. it was part of the american federation of state, county and municipal employees, now the country's largest union for employees, 1.6 million working and retired members. joining me now is the current president of that union and the first black man to hold the title, lee saunders. he addressed those gathered for the march yesterday. lee, i think people forget this was a march for jobs and freedom. tell me why there's been such an attack on labor in recent years. >> i think they want to move labor out of the way completely. they have attacked private sector unions, private member down to 6%, public sector membership and unions is about 35%. they want to come after us. they still have resources. we still have power. they bel
morning. 50 years ago dr. martin luther king jr. talks about how he has a dream, americans at that time embraced a dream that changed america. right now the youngest child of dr. martin luther king is speak at a church service not far away in washington. we are listening to or seeing bernice king speak at shiloh baptist church about her dad. she recalled some recollections with me saying she is always moved by people who meet her and greet her and talk about how her dad had a dream. she was only 5 months old when that speech was made. she told me in an interview that she believes much has been accomplished for being recognized by the contents of her character and not the color of her skin. buff she says there is still a lot of work to be done for education, violence and poverty which are impediments to realizing the dream. >> what happened in in the *, connecticut. that should have jolted us like nothing else. 6-year-olds losing their lives . thinking about chicago as we talked about and all those little boys and kids, young people killing each other. what has happened to a society that
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